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Photography: Sharpest portrait lens was always kind of an oxymoron for me...

because in portraiture you rarely wanted sharpness. Just too much reality. On my Hasselblad I used a cheap Cokin piece of plastic to "de-sharpen" the Zeiss lens. Mamiya made a lens for one of their portrait lenses that you put disks with holes in them to add varying degrees of softening. The Hasselb
2d
By: Blansky
1

Rolex: Sub no date is perfection...although I have a SeaDweller...

I loved having a date mainly due to how handy it was when writing checks etc, but those days are over. And I have the date on my phone if I need it and a calendar. I never liked the cyclops look so to me the perfect Rolex is a sub no date or a SeaDweller (no cyclops) If I was buying today. Sub no da
2d
By: Blansky
0

Photography: Horses for courses...

As a portrait photographer my go to lens was a Hasselblad 150 which I used for 95 percent of my work. When I switched to digital is was a Canon 70-200 Zoom.
2d
By: Blansky
1

Photography: Exquisite work. Thanks for sharing. [nt]

I think the "creating an image" is lost on so many people attempting photography who do simply record what was there. As a backlash to the pictorialist movement the F64 group that included Ansel Adams who stressed sharpness and "realism" did also "create" an image but in a different way. The darkroo
7d
By: Blansky
1

Photography: A great camera I use for vacations and carry with me in my car all the times is...

a fairly small camera called a Canon 50SX which has a 24-1200 zoom. They also upgraded it to a 60 and 70 sx I believe.
11d
By: Blansky
1